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Creative
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3 Crafts to Celebrate Hispanic Heritage

Hands-on fun for Hispanic Heritage Month!

Highlights 4Cs

Curious, Creative, Caring, and Confident™
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Curious
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Creative
The paint brush icon represents creativity. For content about raising a creative child, look for this icon.
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Caring
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Confident
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September 15 – October 15 is Hispanic Heritage Month! In addition to reading diverse stories, learning about history, and trying new foods, another great way to explore different cultures with your kids is by getting hands-on with arts and crafts. Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month together with kid-friendly crafts inspired by arts and culture in Mexico and Guatemala.

Mexican Tin Art
Mexican tin art or Hojalata (ho-huh-la-tuh) is a colorful style of art used to create both practical and ornate objects. While the method and style of this traditional art form differ from region to region, they all begin as flat pieces of tin.
1. Use permanent markers to draw and decorate an animal shape on the bottom of a disposable aluminium pie tin.
2. Cut out the animal shape.
3. Punch a hole through the animal shape, and add a loop of yarn for a hanger.


Guatemalan Worry Dolls
In Guatemala, worry dolls are made from paper, cloth, and string wrapped around a bent wire. According to legend, children tell their worries to a worry doll and then tuck it under their pillow in hopes that the doll will take away their worries.
1. For clothing, wrap and glue yarn, string, or fabric around a non-spring clothespin.
2. For hair, glue on yarn. Use markers to draw a face.


Mexican Yarn Painting
Yarn painting is an art form made by the Huichol peoples of Mexico. It developed from sacred offerings called nierika, which were stone or wood pieces carved with religious designs and painted.
1. On thin cardboard, draw a design with a pencil.
2. With glue, redraw a line or fill in an area of the design.
3. Use a craft stick or your fingers to press yarn onto the glued area.
4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 until the painting is finished.